Utah Guard's Charitable Trust

Recognized as 'Best of State' for 2008

 

By Major Hank McIntire

 

Published June 9, 2008

 

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Chief Warrant Officer Paul Holton, left, and Maj. Gen. Brian Tarbet receive medals in the Community Development category at Best of State awards.

Photo by Maj. Hank McIntire

Chief Warrant Officer Paul Holton, left, and Maj. Gen. Brian Tarbet receive medals in the Community Development category at Best of State awards.

SALT LAKE CITY — The Utah National Guard Charitable Trust was honored at the ‘Best of State’ 2008 awards gala May 31 for its work in assisting Utah’s military families in need.

According to the bestofstate.org Web site, “the Best of State Awards were created to recognize outstanding individuals, organizations and businesses in Utah.”

The Trust was a 2008 medalist as the top charitable/service organization in the Community Development category, which “recognizes individuals and organizations that have demonstrated innovation and excellence in the broad array of civic service,” according to the Best of State Events Guide.

At the event at the Salt Palace Grand Ballroom, representing the Utah National Guard Charitable Trust was Maj. Gen. Brian Tarbet, adjutant general of the Utah Guard.

Chief Warrant Officer Paul Holton is a medalist in Community Development for his work with Operation Give, an international charity.

Photo by Maj. Hank McIntire

Chief Warrant Officer Paul Holton is a medalist in Community Development for his work with Operation Give, an international charity.

For the first round of awards Tarbet joined on stage the other 15 medal recipients in the Community Development category, which also included Chief Warrant Officer Paul Holton of the 141st Military Intelligence Battalion, himself being recognized for his individual work as the founder of Operation Give, a charitable organization which supplies humanitarian aid to civilians living in combat zones.

Later in the program, emcees Shauna Lake and Mark Koelbel explained that winners in each of the ten categories were about to be announced and presented with a Best of State statuette, a 20-pound, solid-bronze sculpture on a granite pedestal.

Chris Cannon, U.S. Congressional representative for Utah’s Third District then announced the winner for the Community Development category. He opened the envelope and to the delight and applause of the audience—and the surprise of the Utah Guard contingent—read the name of the Utah National Guard Charitable Trust as the winner.

Maj. Gen. Brian Tarbet, adjutant general of the Utah National Guard, accepts the Best of State statuette for the UTNG Charitable Trust.

Photo by Maj. Hank McIntire

Maj. Gen. Brian Tarbet, adjutant general of the Utah National Guard, accepts the Best of State statuette for the UTNG Charitable Trust.

General Tarbet returned to the stage and accepted the statuette on the Trust’s behalf, emphasizing that he considered this honor an acknowledgement of the sacrifice of so many military members and families in these challenging times, as well as those who have generously given of their means to help them.

“It’s been a wonderful thing for our Soldiers and Airmen,” said Tarbet after the ceremony. “We get the recognition, but really the ones who should be recognized are the benefactors and donors and allowed us to take care of the Soldiers. They are the real heroes in this.”

The Best of State awards program was broadcast on KUTV Channel 2 Saturday, June 14.

The Utah National Guard Charitable Trust was established in 2005 as a 501(c)3 entity to assist Utah military families with

Kevan Blair, left, and Kip Wadsworth, right, both of Ralph L. Wadsworth Construction, pose with Maj. Gen. Brian Tarbet at Best of State awards.

Photo by Maj. Hank McIntire

Kevan Blair, left, and Kip Wadsworth, right, both of Ralph L. Wadsworth Construction, pose with Maj. Gen. Brian Tarbet at Best of State awards.

medical, home, or property emergencies, lost wages, travel expenses of wounded Soldiers’ families or other unexpected financial needs.

Since its creation, the Trust has disbursed nearly $100,000 to military families in need thanks to the generosity of donors to include corporations, businesses, church groups, and individual adults and children.

“[The Trust helps us] address needs that the bureaucracy is slow to get to,” said Tarbet. “It’s allowed us to take better care of Soldiers and Airmen and to do it expeditiously."

“We are grateful for the recognition and will continue to try to be good stewards of the treasure they give us,” he added.