640th Regional Training Institute

Receives Military Intelligence Accreditation

 

Written by Staff Sgt. Scott Faddis

Published April 18, 2006

 

Download Printer-Friendly Version

       

 

Maj. Frank Mata, U.S. Army Intelligence Center and School, left, presents Col. Ed Willis, 640th Regional Training Institute commander, with an accreditation certificate at a Camp Williams ceremony Apr. 8.

Photo by Staff Sgt. Scott Faddis

Maj. Frank Mata, U.S. Army Intelligence Center and School, left, presents Col. Ed Willis, 640th Regional Training Institute commander, with an accreditation certificate at a Camp Williams ceremony Apr. 8.

CAMP WILLIAMS, Utah — The Army now has another place to train Military Intelligence Soldiers.  Active- and Reserve-Component soldiers can now qualify in Utah as Human Intelligence Collectors (97E), Counterintelligence Agents (97B) and Intelligence Analysts (96B).  

The 640th Regional Training Institute was formally accredited by the United States Army Intelligence Center in a Camp Williams ceremony Apr. 8.  Col. Rafael Torres, Chief of Reserve Forces, and Maj. Frank J. Mata, MI Proponent Title XI Officer, were in attendance representing Fort Huachuca, home of the United States Army Intelligence Center and School.

At the ceremony Maj. Gen. Brian Tarbet, Utah National Guard Adjutant General, thanked the staff and instructors of the 640th for their hard work to accomplish this monumental task.

“It is a miracle things like this can happen,” said Tarbet, speaking about the many obstacles that had to be overcome for anyone outside of Fort Huachuca to conduct MI courses.      

“TRADOC is not a nimble organization,” Tarbet joked. He was alluding to how the Training and Doctrine Command worked diligently with the Utah National Guard and the Military Intelligence Command to allow the 640th to teach MI courses.      

Maj. Gen. Brian Tarbet, Utah National Guard Adjutant General, left, awards Command Sgt. Maj. Joseph Spencer with the Knowlton Award for his contribution to the success of the 640th RTI's MI training mission.

Photo by Staff Sgt. Scott Faddis

Maj. Gen. Brian Tarbet, Utah National Guard Adjutant General, left, awards Command Sgt. Maj. Joseph Spencer with the Knowlton Award for his contribution to the success of the 640th RTI's MI training mission.

Having more MI courses “is good for Soldiers, good for the Nation and good for the world,” said Tarbet. “This happened because a lot of people did what the taxpayers pay us to do: Think outside the box.” 

Pilot courses began last summer at the 640th and were the first of their kind, blending a combination of two classes being taught at Fort Huachuca: the normal full-length courses for the Active Component and shortened courses taught to Soldiers deploying in support of current mobilizations.  The outcome was two courses that were shorter and more intense than the ones taught at the Active-Component school.

Huachuca Reserve Forces Chief Torres first started to work with the 640th in January 2005.

“We made a commitment to bring two courses to Utah,” said Torres. “The initial programs of instruction were a 70-percent solution, and after many long hours of work the staff and instructors came up with the 100-percent solution.”        

Torres was very enthusiastic about what he called “three very successful MI classes taught in January.”

He indicated that there are nine active-duty Soldiers in the round of courses that started Apr. 7, “showing there is no difference between the Active and Reserve Components,” said Torres. 

Torres believes that this is just the beginning for the 640th. There are plans to have Noncommissioned Officer Education System schools for the MI and more Military Occupational Specialties.

Command Sgt. Maj. Franklin Saunders, right, presents Col. Ed Willis, 640th Regional Training Institute, with a Military Intelligence coin at the accreditation ceremony Apr. 8.

Photo by Staff Sgt. Scott Faddis

Command Sgt. Maj. Franklin Saunders, right, presents

Col. Ed Willis, 640th Regional Training Institute, with a Military Intelligence coin at the accreditation ceremony Apr. 8.

“I knew I was dealing with a can-do organization within hours of stepping on the ground at the 640th,” said Mata as he presented the accreditation certificate to 640th commander Col. Edward Willis. “The 640th met or—in many cases—exceeded the standard every time.”

“Today marks the conclusion of a lot of hard work by a lot of people.  The skills taught here are significant to the war effort,” said Willis after accepting the certificate. “In my civilian life I am a physics teacher, so I know a thing a two about inertia.  Inertia is resistance to change.  To stand up these courses was a lot of effort against inertia.”

Command Sgt. Maj. Franklin Saunders, the top enlisted Soldier in the MI command Armywide, was also at the ceremony.

“We are going to come to you for more,” Saunders told the 640th with a smile.  “The Army needs 97E's yesterday.”